Wall framing is done.

The framing crew worked all week and completed the wall framing.

Next week they will set posts, bring in a crane to set beams and then install the joists that make up the roof.

I’m going to install some rigid insulation in the basement tomorrow so I can start framing those walls….I’m tired…but not as tired as my awesome friends lucydrewblogforyou.blogspot.com  (WAY TO GO!!!) who did the Breck Epic mountain bike race…here are some pictures of the house project 🙂

South wall from below at driveway.

South wall from below at driveway.

Storm over Deer Creek Reservoir.

Storm over Deer Creek Reservoir.

Panoramic made with my I-phone...this is not so good.

Panoramic made with my I-phone…this is not so good.

North and South wall erected.

North and South wall erected.

Window and sliding door openings to the deck with view to south.

Window and sliding door openings to the deck with view to south.

East wall and entry.

East wall and entry.

North wall being built.

North wall being built.

Finishing floors before the exterior walls are built…say whaaaat!

We decided to pour the concrete over the main subfloor before framing the house. This was done so the concrete contractor could power trowel and burnish the floor without any walls or corners in the way as this will be the finish floor for the house, other than a couple areas where the floor will have tile.

Once again, I snapped the chalk lines on the green concrete to make saw cuts, right as I finished it started raining lightly, but luckily, the storm only brushed by and didn’t wash off the chalk before I returned with the concrete saw.

I made a mistake in my hurry to get the lines snapped, rent the saw and get back to do the work, so I have a line that is not square, and am very disappointed in myself. Once you start cutting concrete, you can’t really just change your mind and fix it.

Now I have to figure out how to protect the floors from the framers and all the other trades. I can’t seal it for at least a week or so. I’m going to try covering it with some large rolls of thick vinyl wallpaper I bought at the Habitat for Humanity ReStore. There will be more on that later in the blog.  http://www.habitat.org/restores  

Framing the rest of the house resumes on Monday.

The powder room and kitchen floor concrete was left about 5/8" low to allow for tile to meet the fiished concrete on the same plane.

The powder room and kitchen floor concrete was left about 5/8″ low to allow for tile to meet the finished concrete on the same plane.

Great room looking northeast

Great room looking northeast

 A look at the concrete that will be the finished floor in most of the house.

A look at the concrete that will be the finished floor in most of the house. It should appear more even after curing and then cleaning all the dust and footprints off. On the other hand, it’s concrete, and one has to expect the gradations, cracking, and imperfections, like natural wood, no two pieces are alike🙂

Looking south across the floor.

Looking south across the great room floor.

Pumping concrete in the morning sun.

Pumping concrete in the morning sun.

Framing! This is good :-)

So the framers started laying sill plates on Thursday, busted their ass! Continued Friday and were willing to come work Saturday morning to get enough sheeting on that I could lay bottom plates for interior walls over the weekend….HUGE Kudos to the framing crew with Greylight Construction in Midway for going the extra mile and working on Saturday!!! This allows me and my son Max to get the interior walls laid out and bottom plates on for radiant heat tubing and a concrete pour on Thursday.

While they were doing the floor we finished up the second level of gabion retaining walls. All done!

Just as we snapped about half the chalk lines on the floor for the walls the storm clouds came over, rained enough to wash away the chalk lines, and gave us the opportunity to do them again. After the rain, and we waited for it to dry, we finished up the chalk lines, ran to the local Ace Hardware and grabbed some lacquer to spray over the chalk lines. Started spraying and it started raining…… Hopefully they are there in the morning for us to nail down the plates.

It hasn't really rained for 2 months, but once we get some floor sheeting in, it rains...go figure.

It hasn’t really rained for 2 months, but once we get some floor sheeting in, it rains…go figure.

Floor joists. 3-1/2" I-joists to hold 3" of standard concrete flooring.

Floor joists. 3-1/2″ I-joists to hold 3″ of standard concrete flooring.

Second level of gabion retaining walls finished. Glad we had a skid steer to do this.

Second level of gabion retaining walls finished. Glad we had a skid steer to do this.

I got some good help from my son Max today filling gabions and working on the floor layout. He'll be cutting floor plates tomorrow.

I got some good help from my son Max today filling gabions and working on the floor layout. He’ll be cutting floor plates tomorrow.

Framing started

Framing started today…3 days after it was supposed to. I do not understand how these things go so off schedule. Despite this delay, I am excited to see the house begin to look more like a house than just some concrete int he ground!

The crew worked hard to get the sill plates and ledgers up, despite some issues caused by the foundation crew. These things can happen and you need to find ways to work around them, but it would sure be nice if more attention was paid to details that affect other aspects of the build.

Pictures below, I’m too tired to go on and on.

Crew working on the bearing wall.

Crew working on the bearing wall.

Main bearing wall for the floor and that transfers to load to the roof support.

Main bearing wall for the floor and that transfers to load to the roof support.

When the anchor bolts are set too low to put the bolt on above the sill plate, we'll be drilling and adding epoxy.

When the anchor bolts are set too low to put the bolt on above the sill plate, we’ll be drilling and adding epoxy.

When a foundation wall id so out of plumb, that the floor needs a steel angle iron to support the bearing wall....

When a foundation wall id so out of plumb, that the floor needs a steel angle iron to support the bearing wall….

Gabion walls and lots of rocks.

30 tons of rock …. so far. I ordered 15 tons of rock, then 15 tons more rock! I hand loaded some in the bottom of the gabions and then reserved a skid steer for the rest. The framer I contracted with offered to let me use his skid steer for the job since he will have it on site in a few days anyway to forklift lumber on the job. What a lifesaver!

We still have to order 15 more tons of rock, for a second level of retaining that may have to be hand loaded…Ugh! The whole reason for getting these filled so early in the process is that once the deck is up, we would have to load them all by hand.

Here are some photos of the job in 95 degree heat. I hooked up the hose and created a fine mister, L says every construction project needs a fine mister!🙂

First time driving one of these machines in a long time.

First time driving one of these machines in a long time.

Gabions completed on East side of the drive.

Gabions completed on East side of the drive.

The best wife in the world...helping with filling gabions, not a fun job, but still smiling!

The best wife in the world…helping with filling gabions, not a fun job, but still smiling!

July 27, and 95 degrees in the sun called for some cooling off. An unanticipated use of having water on site!

July 27, and 95 degrees in the sun called for some cooling off. An unanticipated use of having water on site!

Gabions on the west side of the drive...a little too full, we'll need to take a few out.

Gabions on the west side of the drive…a little too full, we’ll need to take a few out.

Radiant heat, concrete, less dust and gabion baskets!

That’s right…less dust! The driveway has been the culmination of clay and large trucks grinding it up creating what we refer to on a mountain biking trail as “moon dust”, when the dust is so fine, it goes EVERYWHERE!

A lot has been going since the last post. Including cutting more neighbors phone lines that happen to run right through the middle of the lot, and finally getting an easement and a power trench run. We should have power within a few days!

The excavators finished back filling and rough grading the property as well as putting gravel in the driveway where we will eventually have concrete, and road base over the rest of the 200 plus foot long drive. This gravel and road base will keep the dust down considerably. To help this, when we trenched to put in the water line and new meter, I put in a stop ‘n’ waste for a sprinkler system with a ‘T’ and a hose bib, so we would have water during construction. I can now spray down the dust if needed

The basement floor is heated with radiant tubes encased in the concrete slab, so the plumbing/heating company installed those, and then we poured the concrete over 1/2 of the slab. The other half is poured on Tuesday, July 26th.

In the meantime, while waiting for the Utah holiday called pioneer day (Pie and Beer day to those of us not of the predominant religion) weekend to pass, I built many of the gabion baskets that will retain the 2 sides of the driveway. Gabion baskets are steel wire grid cages that hold stone, and retain earth while still letting moisture pass through and not getting the hydrostatic pressure of a standard concrete of block wall. They also look super cool, and have kind of a modern, rustic feel to them. We need to fill the baskets with rock, which sounds like a daunting task, so I may rent a skidster and load the rock by machine to save my back. After all we are looking at about 23 tons of rock for the 9 baskets I have assembled so far.

We will start framing in about a week. It may finally start looking like a house!!!

Radiant heat tubes all set to be embedded in the basement slab.

Radiant heat tubes all set to be embedded in the basement slab.

Gravel for the driveway that will be concrete outside the garage.

Gravel for the driveway that will be concrete outside the garage.

Gabions on the west side of the drive, and may get a partial second level to help hold the dirt back.

Gabions on the west side of the drive, and may get a partial second level to help hold the dirt back.

The afternoon sun highlighting rust on the gabion baskets. I'm am counting on them not rusting out before I do :-)

The afternoon sun highlighting rust on the gabion baskets. I’m am counting on them not rusting out before I do🙂

Gabions to the right of the garage.

Gabions to the right of the garage.

Long winding driveway covered in road base. It will eventually have a gravel topping and remain that way.

Long winding driveway covered in road base. It will eventually have a gravel topping and remain that way.

Gabion baskets on approach to the garage.

Gabion baskets on approach to the garage.

The concrete cowboy putting a slick finish with a power trowel on the basement floor. This will be the finish floor.

The concrete cowboy putting a slick finish with a power trowel on the basement floor. This will be the finish floor.

The power trench and conduit from a neighbors property to ours where a HUGE phone cable (holding about 50 wires) was cut several weeks ago and caused some big delays in getting power to the house.

The power trench and conduit from a neighbors property to ours where a HUGE phone cable (holding about 50 wires) was cut several weeks ago and caused some big delays in getting power to the house.

 

 

Getting ready for basement slab

Gravel is being poured in to the house to support the basement concrete slab. Once the sub-rough plumbing was in place and gravel was put into the living area of the basement, L and I put in radon mitigation piping. It was difficult pulling the gravel out of the way to get the pipe at the right level, just below where the slab will be, so we built the radon piping for the area under the garage and gear storage room slab before the gravel goes in.

After the gravel is in, we will put in 2″of XPS insulation to give the radiant heated slab (about R-10) insulation, covered by a 6 mila moisture barrier taped. After that, the plumbers will put the radiant heat tubing in and that will all be covered in concrete that will be the finished floor surface of the basement.

Overview of the basement and the pile of foam waiting to go above the gravel and below the poured slab.

Overview of the basement and the pile of foam waiting to go above the gravel and below the poured slab.

Radon piping in the foreground and sub-rough plumbing poking up through the gavel in the basement living area,

Radon piping in the foreground and sub-rough plumbing poking up through the gavel in the basement living area,

Caulk on the back side of foam that will separate the basement slab from the foundation walls to keep the cold from the footings and foundation from transferring to the slab.

Caulk on the back side of foam that will separate the edges of the basement slab from the foundation walls to keep the cold from the footings and foundation from transferring to the slab.